Thinking Transatlantic

Germany is at the center of an essay contest, film screening and roundtable discussion in November.

 

By Barbara Melendez

USF News

 

TAMPA, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2012) – “China isn’t the only economic powerhouse on the scene,” says USF Associate Professor Margit Grieb. “Germany is playing an important role in resolving the European economic crisis and there’s a lot to learn about the great strides this nation is making on so many levels.”

 

An opportunity for the public to learn more about Germany is being offered as part of Think Transatlantic Campus Weeks in November. 

 

Fitting neatly within International Education Month at USF, the German Program is responsible for giving USF the distinction of being named one of only 30 universities selected to partner with the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany for this project. 

 

The German Embassy is sponsoring activities around the country in an effort to promote greater interest in a part of the world that has a strong connection with the United States. German Americans constitute the nation’s largest ethnic group, and the two countries are strong allies. 

 

Grieb, the main event coordinator, is working with other members of the German faculty, Department of World Languages Chair and Professor Stephan Schindler and Stefan Huber to organize the events. Co-sponsors include USF World and the Department of World Languages.

 

Dates to mark on calendars for Think Transatlantic are Nov. 12, 13 and 27. 

 

The first date is the deadline for a student essay contest. The second is a film screening. Third is a roundtable discussion which includes a reception. Both the film and the discussion are free and open to the public. 

 

Any student who would like to be published in a renowned political magazine and wants to be featured on www.Germany.Info should give the essay contest a try. A prize of $200 or $100 is an added incentive along with the chance to participate in the national competition in Washington, D.C. A free trip to Berlin will go to the overall winner of the national competition.

 

The essay submission form and contest rules are available online and through Stefan Huber via email, Huber@usf.edu.

 

The film, which will be shown at 3:30 p.m. in the USF Tampa Library’s Grace Allen Room, is Schultze Gets the Blues, written and directed by Michael Schorr. It won Best Film at the 2003 Stockholm International Film Festival.

 

On the final day, Nov. 27, “The United States and Germany in the 21st Century” is the subject of the discussion from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Marshall Student Center, Room 2708. The panelists are among USF’s leading experts in their fields. They include Elizabeth Strom, director of the Office of Community Engagement & Partnerships and associate professor, Department of Geography, Environment and Planning on “Building Better Cities:  Transatlantic Lessons;” Walter Andrusyszyn, adjunct professor, College of Business on "The Eurozone Crisis and the Challenge to German leadership in the EU;" Heide Castañeda ,assistant professor and graduate director, Department of Anthropology on “The Interrelationship between Immigration and Health Care in US and German Policy; ” Peter Funke, assistant professor, Department of Government & International Affairs on “Social Movements in Europe and the US;” and Stephan Schindler, one of the event organizers, will talk about "Subotić, Klinsi, & Co.: German-American Soccer Connections."

 

The discussion will be followed directly by the closing reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Essay contest participants will be on hand and the winning essay will be announced.

 

For more information about Think Transatlantic, visit http://languages.usf.edu/thinktransatlantic/. For more information on the reception, contact Claudine Boniec at cboniec@usf.edu.

 

Barbara Melendez can be reached at 813-974-4563.